Quick Tips: Make your photos look great

There’s no substitute for having a great graphic designer, whether that’s in house or as a trusted on call contractor.  However, if your organization’s communications and/or development plan includes maintaining some social media accounts or blogging, then you need a way for the person staffing those accounts to create images that serve you well.

I don’t think I should need to say it, but great writing is not enough on the web.  Whatever you’re using, you need to mix up your media, and it all needs to be a) reasonably high quality and b) brand appropriate.  I’ll get to a primer on gifs, video, and data presentation some other time.  Today, let’s focus on images, and a tool that I’ve been enjoying recently: PicMonkey.

Advantages:

  • It’s pretty easy to mess around with.  Taste is harder to come by, so make sure you have the right person using it, but you can make things look good, tailored, processed, etc. in any combination using mostly automatic functions.  If you’re really good, you can make it sing…but that’s the best measure of a tool: can you become functional with it quickly (yes, I think), and can you keep getting better (pretty infinitely).
  • It’s a very good way to layer text (with a mindbogglingly vast selection of fonts) over photos.  That’s something simple and easy, conceptually, that can enhance your pinterest, twitter, or Facebook feed…and  this tool makes it trivial to execute.  (You’ve got to come up with good photos and good words – that’s still hard – but putting it together doesn’t need to be)
  • The price is right for nonprofit use.  You can get decent mileage out of their free version, but the cadillac version (they call it Royal) is all of $33 for the year.

Give it a try.  You may even enjoy the collage feature – ask some of your clients/community members/whatever term applies for the people who are at the heart of your mission and operations to share 5 shots each that they feel captures your organization.  Combine them in house.  Not only are you likely to come up with some shareable and feel-good images, but you’re likely to learn something essential about perspectives on your work.  Zero risk, and the chance you might find a new angle that will resonate deeply with donors, and other tidbits to put in your pocket for the next big solicitation push.

Public recognition vs. Public service

In my consulting life, I’ve helped a bunch of startup nonprofits get started.  But that’s also one of the jobs I turn down…a lot.  I have a hard time working for folks I don’t believe in, and I see far, far too many individuals who want to start their very own nonprofit instead of taking an entry-level job and working their way up in established organizations.

A rather good article by Amy Schiller at The Baffler made me think a little bit more deeply about what’s happening in those situations.

She writes about the rise (and foibles) of “philanthro-capitalists” – paralleling my ambitious future founders in naiveté and hubris.  The thing I am intensely interested in is the strong desire to get individual recognition – for being a founder, for being a savior, for being a hero who is smarter that everyone who has come before and lo, has fixed our problems.

It strikes me as a cultural psychology problem. Read more

Mailbag: Cultivating journalists to find donors

Q: My board is complaining that no one in our community has  heard of our organization, and that if we want to raise more money we have to raise our visibility.  They aren’t wrong, but I don’t know how to fix the problem.  My communications staff have written a gazillion press releases, sent out pictures of all our events, etc. – but nothing has worked.  A peer told me to think of it like fundraising, that I have to build relationships with journalists if I want them to write about our work, but I don’t know what that actually means.  Is he right? How do you do that?

Q: He’s right.  Look – press releases are not going to be enough to get you a ton of press.  They’re necessary (and shouldn’t be hard to produce) for other reasons, but they’re not enough to crank out (even if you agonize over them) and call it a communications strategy.

Building relationships with journalists is a good idea, and it’s not unlike fundraising, which is, at its core, all about relationships if you’re doing it well…but clearly that isn’t a stand alone insight for you.  Let me see if I can help.

I used to teach SAT prep classes, a gazillion years ago when scores only went up to 1600 and I didn’t feel cheated by getting paid less than 1/6th of what my students were paying per hour…one of the things that stuck with me was a bit of the opening class that tried to put the kids at ease and make them feel they could tackle the test: the SAT is not written by geniuses, it’s written by plain old people trying to do a job.  To understand how to answer SAT questions, you learn how to write them, which involves putting yourself in the mind of a perfectly average person who wants to clock in, write some questions, get paid, and go home.

Journalists probably have a different set of dreams and ambitions than your average SAT question writer, so it’s not a perfect analogy, but if you want to figure out how to get better press, you need to put yourself in the mind of a journalist-as-journeyman…whatever their dreams of Pulitzers and Peabodys, for right now, the writers you need are just trying to be successful at writing things that will make their editors happy.  They can’t afford to just turn around glorified event listings, they can’t reprint your press release verbatim, and if there’s no actual NEWS in the news story you pitch to them, you should thank them for being polite when you waste their time.  But, on the other hand, they probably aren’t looking for their own personal Deep Throat – if you’re talking to people on the local events or nonprofits/mission driven beat, they don’t need Snowden magnitude leaks to write a story.

So.

  1. Be respectful.  When you look for folks to pitch a story to about your fundraising gala, make sure you’ve thought about why it’s news.  If you want a feature on one of your volunteers, or one of your core programs (or a new one), or your organization in general, make sure you’ve thought beyond press release: know why this is news, know who would want to read about it, and have a realistic sense of whether the story you’re pitching is going to fit in with the normal collection of stories at whatever outlet you’re talking to.  It’s tacky (and unproductive) to try to get a writer to write something on your behalf that would stick out like a sore thumb in their publication – whether it’s the little town circular or a national magazine with great circulation, you’re not going to be the exception.  Don’t put the burden on the poor journalist to break it to you that your 14th annual golf tournament isn’t worthy of a feature in the New York Times…
  2. Pay attention to what people write.  You have an organization with a mission.  Who’s writing, locally or nationally, about that mission or related topics?  If you have a program or event you’d love to see covered, same question.  To go to the fundraising analogy, you’d never meet someone, learn that they’ve made philanthropic donations in the past and then, without knowing anything more about them, say “oh, you make donations?  You should give us $5 million for our capital campaign.”  Now, you might well say “I hear you’re a philanthropist?  I’d love to tell you about our organization…when can we grab lunch so we can get to know each other?”  Similarly, you’re OK to meet folks and say “oh, you’re a writer?  I’d love to hear more…”  But just as you’d never presume to know what ask to make to a perfect stranger, you really shouldn’t be presuming to know what ask to make of a journalist before you know what they write.
  3. But eventually, you’re going to make that ask…so just like you build a portfolio of prospective donors, each of whom has capacity and specific thoughts on how they want to be supportive of your organization, you’re going to build a portfolio of journalists so that you can make the right ask to the right person when the time comes.  You’ll look for local people, you’ll look for people who cover your mission directly or tangentially, etc.  Start making connections.
  4. How?  Twitter is awesome for connecting to journalists, also many folks will have public/newspaper hosted email accounts so you can get in touch directly.  Start by complimenting folks whose articles you like.  Obviously, this involves an element of truth…don’t be obsequious, don’t blow smoke…but it’s not deceitful or wrong to actively look for folks doing great work, or to let them know you appreciate their writing.  Ask questions, if you have them.  Engage with them.  DO NOT MAKE ANY PITCHES unless you’re pretty sure it’s a good idea…like fundraising, there’s no single checklist or marker for that.  You have a risk tolerance, you have your own idea of how well you need/want to know someone, you have your own sense of urgency about a particular project or pitch, you have an understanding of where you stand in a competitive landscape…you’re balancing all these and more, so I can’t tell you exactly when it’s write to make a pitch, just like I couldn’t tell you exactly when it’s OK to make a major solicitation.  It’s your relationship, you make the call.  What I’m saying is that you need to treat it as seriously as a big solicitation – don’t jump the gun because you figure it’s not a personal relationship with the journalist.  It is.
  5. In the same vein, if you’ve got good relationships with a portfolio of writers, you can ask their advice on getting more stories written.  Use them to help you shape and direct pitches.  Get them to brainstorm with you.  Like donors, actual, meaningful involvement means greater connection to you and your organization.  Greater connection means greater willingness to help out one way or another.
  6. Think outside the box.  We no longer live in a world where TV news and print newspapers/magazines are how you get the word out about something, whether it’s an event or a mission.  Bloggers can be amazing when it comes to substantive pieces directed at a very specific audience.  Every town, it seems, has a slew of push-out event bloggers (people/companies that send weekly or other regular calendar write-ups about what’s going on in the community, via email, social media, text…).  Hyperlocal news sites are exploding.  Social media in general shouldn’t be overlooked – the right re-tweet or Facebook share to thousands of followers might be worth way more than an article in the local paper.
  7. Visibility isn’t necessarily just about getting articles written about you.  Think about ways for you and  your program folks to become visible experts in your field.  HARO (help a reporter out) is a hit-or-miss service, but keeping an eye out for ways to get quoted/featured as an expert is a good basic practice.
  8. Get your board involved.  We so often focus on “ambassadorship” as a function of board members that directly relates to fundraising…general publicity is an obvious part of ambassadorship.  Make sure you give your board recommendations for doing that effectively – should they send potential PR contacts to you?  How much should they butter them up first?  What are the key points they should be hitting if they get the chance?  What do you expect them to do on their own social media accounts?  Hmmm….very much like fundraising – you’ll get what you want more often if you break it down into manageable steps and explicit requests, and having a conversation about communications strategy at the board level at least once a year is a good idea.  They are, after all, responsible for maintaining institutional ideals, and image is at least halfway to identity, n’est pas?

Hope that helps…

Keeping up with the Joneses – social media edition

Interesting new survey just being reported on HubSpot on social media practices among 9,000 small to medium nonprofit organizations in North America.  Check it out here.

It’s always interesting to see what other folks are doing, in aggregate – my clients know that I am constantly asking where they are in relation to best practices and common practices.  You should never confuse the two…but the rules are the same: you need to know what the best practices are and you need to know what the herd is doing, because you never want to be far afield from either unless you have made a strategic choice to do so.

So, go through the report.  See how you stack up.  Remember that these are NOT best practices…and I’m going to go through some of the things I think are problematic for the organizations represented here…but aren’t you curious to see how you rank with social media savvy?

Helpful hint – be sure to include some of these findings in your next presentation to the board.  Regardless of whether you seem to be far ahead of the curve or need help to prioritize a jump into the 21st Century, it’s GREAT fodder for productive conversation at the board level.   Read more

Quick Tips: Good content deserves good delivery

I had the pleasure of stumbling across a nice take on creativity from Mr. Preston Trombley, a musician and artist and Toastmaster.  His 7 minutes on Beethoven, Einstein and You is a great Monday morning pick me up.

So why am I linking and not embedding?  Well, the video quality is unfortunate.  Shaky cam, shot vertically, and while Mr. Trombley uses the room effectively, the videographer hasn’t really planned for that, so there’s a lot of quick pans to keep him in frame.  It’s bad enough that I feel it needs a warning (it may make you nauseated; feel free to just listen to it instead of watching), and also a disclaimer – that I know it’s terrible production quality, but I think the content is worth a listen anyway.

Two things to take from this: first, you have it in you to be a more creative person…but also – be sure that you’re not obscuring whatever messages you have for the world by not taking the time to master the basics of new technologies as they whiz by us.   Read more

On the internet, carry salt

I subscribe to a ton of services that help me scour the internet, looking for good articles, tips, research and advice on fundraising and nonprofit management more generally.  Look – I’m living proof that anyone can say pretty much anything on the internet…but every now and then an article comes along that gets my blood boiling and I feel the need to remind everyone I know that you have to take everything with a grain of salt and read it through a lens of common sense and skepticism.

Here’s one that seems useful for nonprofits.  Research reveals four simple ways your not-for-profit can motivate donors. Headline follows the formula for standard click bait: [number] of [things] that are useful because [x].  Plus, it’s based on research!  Great.  Let’s look. Read more

Training for Fundraisers: what do you need?

There’s an interesting question that’s been posed to CEOs and EDs of nonprofits who participate in the LinkedIn group sponsored by Bridgespan: “What training do you offer your fundraisers to make them more effective at the sales side of the nonprofit world?”

Check out some of the responses here.

I’m interested in the general question of what training you offer fundraisers, period.  Sure, there are the formal educational programs, certificates and degree programs alike, offered at credible institutions…and I imagine that there is or will soon be a cottage industry aimed at test prep for the Certified Fundraising Executive exam.  I’m going to ignore those for the moment – I’m asking more about how organizations train their own fundraisers.

What training do fundraisers need?  What do you want your fundraisers to know?

Here’s my official call for comments and/or private emails with thoughts.  In return, I will, during this calendar year, develop at least one curriculum for use (FREE!) in house, wherever you are…

Go!

Plus ça change

I hope you’re reading and paying attention to the thoughts of Lucy Bernholz, a fine scholar and thinker about philanthropy in the modern age.

Her blog post from February is something I’ve been meaning to write about for a while, and the Jewish holiday of Passover seemed like a great time to do it.  Her post title (and thesis) is this: Disruptive wealth hasn’t yet disrupted philanthropic forms.

She’s right.  But what does that mean for the practitioner? Read more

Quick Tips: Development Impact Toolkit

I love passing on interesting tools I come across online in the course of my paying work.  The latest is a website called Development Impact & You (DIY).  Their tagline is “practical tools to trigger and support social innovation.”

I’m not so sure that all of their forms are easy to simply download and use effectively, but there’s a clean structure to everything they’ve put up so far – for anyone looking to provoke important conversations about organizational effectiveness or internal processes, using these can make you look polished and authoritative.  As far as how useful they are, well, they’re tools.  You’re going to have to wield them well if you want them to work for you.

Start here, on their Tools page.  Enjoy!

Quick Tip: Waterlogue

I don’t get paid to plug anything.  But I love to share my excitement about products that make my life easier or more pleasant…and this one makes me look like a graphic genius with my consulting work.  (And while I have a good eye, I have very few execution skills.  I need my tools!)

Don’t worry – after handing over a few files, I tell them how I did it…my consulting philosophy is always to provide a platter of fish and rod at the same time.  The best way to earn new work is always to be so good that you’re working on referrals more than repeat business…after a while, folks start to wonder why they’re paying you. AGAIN.

Here’s my “secret” new toy: Waterlogue.  For $2.99 (at the time this post was published), you can turn low grade photos into passable art for your organization’s publications, website, tumblr, Pinterest, and/or prints for donors.

That last one is a fun idea.  Snap some not so great photos at the gala?  They’ll be much better as watercolors.  And your donors won’t see it coming – they’ll be impressed and delighted, you’ll come across as memorably sophisticated.  Wins, all around.  You’re welcome.